Category: Art

Australian Art: What’s New and What’s Hot

Australia is among the world’s largest art market. This does not come as a surprise considering that a lot of the country’s artists are distinguished locally and abroad. Some art collectors and enthusiasts flock to Australia to have a look and scour paintings and sculptures from renowned and upcoming Australian artists. Buying an art may be a gamble Down Under, but I heard that there’s a lot of free betting in Australia.

Hottest Australian Artists

These talented Aussies will surely make a splash in the art industry, both in the country and abroad.

  • Ben Quilty

Since winning the prestigious Archibald Prize in 2011, Ben Quilty’s career had steadily gone up. He is regarded as one of the country’s most talented contemporary artists and have painted subjects on morality, masculinity and national identity. Quilty also won the Prudential Eye Awards for Contemporary Asian Art. Among his recent exhibits were held in the Philippines, Hong Kong and Canberra.

  • Johnny Romeo

Johnny Romeo, the leading pop artist in the country, focuses his craft in Neo-Expressionist Pop Art. His creativeness and brilliance are drawn from street art and the rock ‘n roll. Romeo had showcased some of his paintings, which are usually bold and vibrant representations of cultural icons, in and around Australia, New Zealand, the United States and in some parts of Europe.

  • Anthony Lister

One of the country’s most celebrated contemporary artist is Anthony Lister who usually uses walls as his canvass. In fact, most of his masterpieces are in the form of street art. According to the PictureStore, Lister gets his inspiration from pop art, expressionism and the modern youth culture. He had his exhibitions all over Australia, the United States, United Kingdom, and in some parts of Europe.

Art Trends Down Under

One of the latest trends in the country’s art scene involves the bold use of color in minimalist abstract geometric shapes. In fact, an exhibit consisting of stunning and eye-popping displays of this trend was held at Sullivan and Strumpf. This new trend focuses on the color and the process where everything interacts and falls in place.

Aboriginal Art styles are also getting rave reactions from art enthusiasts. Considered as the oldest living art practice in the world, Aboriginal Art is composed of variations that include X-ray Art, Cross Hatching, Dot Painting, Wandjinas and Ochre, among others.

Opening Nights: More than Cheese and Wine

Opening nights of art galleries or exhibits are one of the most anticipated events of art enthusiasts. Everyone, especially the management team, is on their A-game. The festive and sometimes classy atmosphere is always complemented with wine, sumptuous food and elegant fixtures and furniture. There are also instances where escorts are employed to liven up the proceedings. In fact, some gallery owners have been known to hire the services of beautiful women from escort agencies. With this being said, the paintings, sculptures or memorabilia on display still remain the star of the night. Here are some museums, galleries and exhibits that feature unusual and sometimes extraordinary but informative displays on their opening nights:

  • Holocaust Memorial Museum

Millions of people around the world witnessed the harrowing crimes of the Holocaust. The Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. aims to provide details and illustrate what the people during that time experienced. Some of the displays can be viewed on the Internet. For an interactive tour online, you can contact them at 202 488 0400.

  • Cartoon Museum

The Cartoon Museum in the United Kingdom can be traced a few blocks away from the British Museum. The main attraction on the site are British cartoon arts, comic arts and caricatures that date back as early as the 18th century. Among the highlights of the museum are cartoon strips of Dennis the Menace and Billy the Whizz.

Located at Notting Hill, the museum features more than 12,000 boxes, packets and tins of items such as cereals, beans and powder. Visitors will surely bring back good memories of their favourite brands as they move across shelves and shelves of well-stocked consumer products.

  • UFO Museum and Research Centre

The museum in Roswell attracts skeptics and believers of artificial intelligence as they feature memorabilia from the infamous Roswell incident that happened in 1947. After your trip, expect debate with fellow travellers whether the stuff you saw was real or not.

  • Icelandic Phallogical Museum

Most of sex museums in the world can be found in France, the Netherlands and the United States. But the Phallogical Museum in Iceland brings a new form of “exhibition of penises.” More than 300 penis specimens from almost all mammals on land and seas in the world can be found here.

Artists Who Make Money, And Artists Who Don’t

There are many, many, more artists who do not make money from their art than there are artists who make reasonable amounts of money from their work. Think of poor old Vincent Van Gogh, whose paintings now sell for millions and millions of dollars; but who was forced to beg from his brother Theo, all his tragic life. Art is, in my opinion, a very shady occupation and world. I have always seen artists akin to prostitutes, in the Dorian Grey tradition, selling their art instead of their bodies.

Is being a commercial artist selling your soul, or in fact just selling your art?

Rich people buy art; and artists and their managers or agents must curry favour with these wealthy benefactors. Suck up to, talk shit to, hang out with, and do whatever is necessary to sell their art to them. Artists sit within a web of social networks, sometimes as their iconic centres; and their images and ideas must ruminate through those milieus.

Artists Who Make Money, And Artists Who Don’t

Some artists make a lot of money, such as Jeff Koons who constructs extra large puppies in a kitschy style that defies belief in good taste. His Balloon Dog (orange) recently sold for $58.4 million at Christie’s in New York. Jasper Johns and his signature symbolic art sells for seven figures in some cases. Robert Ryman, Bruce Nauman and Richard Prince are all American artists who command million dollar price tags for their artistic works.

Exhibiting art can be compared to what people in business call lead generation. An idea, an image and an aesthetic depiction are put out into the world, or into a microcosm within the greater community. Poor people don’t, generally, purchase art, so that microcosm is middle class or upper middle class. Artists can be trendy, and/or seen to be at the cutting edge of ideas and fashion. Brett Whitely was such an artist in the nineteen seventies and beyond; he blurred the divisions between popular art, music and fashion.

Andy Warhol was a much bigger example of the same kind of thing in America and then around the world. Commercial art meets high end culture and becomes pop culture; suddenly appealing to a mass audience. Digital art is now all pervasive in the wider community through the uptake of computers and digital platforms. More people than ever are exposed to the visual arts and most of them don’t even realise that it is happening.